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Load image into Gallery viewer, 64GB KingSpec 2.5-inch PATA/IDE SSD Solid State Disk (MLC Flash) SM2236 Controller
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 64GB KingSpec 2.5-inch PATA/IDE SSD Solid State Disk (MLC Flash) SM2236 Controller
Vendor
KingSpec

64GB KingSpec 2.5-inch PATA/IDE SSD Solid State Disk (MLC Flash) SM2236 Controller

4.0
Regular price
€94,00
Sale price
€94,00
Regular price
€154,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€60,00)
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  • Tracked Shipping on All Orders
  • 14 Days Returns

Description

  • 64GB SSD Solid State Disk
  • 2.5-inch PATA/IDE standard
  • Read speed up to 108MB/sec
  • Write speed up to 59MB/sec
  • 44-pin IDE interface

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Customer Reviews

Linux Mint on old Toshiba M35 Jumper is for "Master" position, off to install as slave drive, see spec link cm3-computer.com/media/docs/kingspec_25-inch_pata_slc_ssd_datasheet_v11.pdf ; worked in old XP Toshiba M35-s456 (after failed 80GB HD) for installing Linux Mint 17 from usb drive. Mint took care of setting up SSD with operating system after clicking on install after system was running from USB thumbdrive. Good speed. Shows about 48GB? left available after installation. Just want to use old system for showing photos, but it works good for FireFox browser internet access as well. Unfortunately, old Toshiba screen wants to fall off, and system seems to run pretty warm with fan staying on blowing out plenty of hot air. 4Bigger than normal 2.5 HDD. If you are going to use this for an embedded system, don't buy it. If you insist, at least check the installation surroundings.Because it is slightly longer and bigger than normal HDD you'd want to replace with it. At worst case (like my Bose Lifestyle system) it won't fit.In the picture, the one above is normal HDD's PATA pins, the one below is SSD PATA pins. The difference may be tiny, but for embedded system with very tight tolerance, you will have problems.Unfortunately the biggest problem is -I believe there may be some problem with the controller- the performance is utterly slow on the system. In fact, it took longer to fire up on the Bose compared to its original-spec HDD, and it can only read, not write (Bose could copy the CD into the HDD, somehow not possible on this SSD).So it simply fails to work on my case, and while it works on normal computer, I have to mention it is very, very slow. This is the only reason why I gave 2 stars instead of 1 star, since at least it works on the computers.I am returning this SSD because it simply does not work at all for my Bose system.....since many people who would buy SSD with outdated connection interface are either ones with very old computer, or on embedded systems, you can say this SSD works half of the time, and that is if you are willing to use this rather slow speed. 2Install to a Dell Inspiron 700 Notebook with Improvement I have an elderly Dell Inspiron 700m that I occasionally use for Powerpoint presentations because its screen is larger than my netbooks. The 700m was very slow, taking almost 3 minutes or longer to boot. I installed the KingSpec 64 Gb to an external USB/ID interface, cloned the internal drive to the KingSpec with Casper and it seemed to copy fine. I could read and write to the KingSpec on the interface. However, when I swapped the KingSpec into the Inspiron Hard Drive location, it would not recognize the drive and would not boot. Checking F2, it was not recognized in the BIOS. I put the old Drive back in and it was recognized.I thought there might be a missing driver somewhere, so I reinstalled the KingSpec to the USB/IDE interface and selected the USB/IDE interface to boot first in the BIOS and put the original drive back in the HD slot. The Inspiron booted to the KingSpec on the USB/IDE interface. I checked it out and made sure that was it was working. Because the USB interface is slow, the performance was no better than the old Hitachi drive. I then turned the system off and swapped the KingSpec back into the Hard Drive location and put the old drive on the USB/IDE interface. I was going to boot to the USB/IDE interface, then clone the original drive from the USB/IDE interface back to the KingSpec in the Hard Drive Location thinking that Casper may help the system find and recognize the KingSpec.When I checked the F2 BIOS, I saw the KingSpec was now recognized in the BIOS in Drive Slot 0. On a lark, I changed the boot to the internal Hard Drive (KingSpec) and Windows booted normally.Checking the KingSpec with CrystalDisk Mark, the performance went from Read 29 Mb/sec to about 86 Mb/s and Write 24 Mb/s to 43 Mb/s. This does not put it at the max of its ratings probably because of shortcomings of the USB interface, but it basically tripled the read speed and doubled the write speed which is a decent upgrade for approximately $55. It speeds the boot process significantly. So, we will see how that goes.Physically, the KingSpec is larger and I had to remove the lift tray to make it work with a little bit of careful pushing and fitting. This should not matter because the drive is not going anyplace in its present location and will not slip out of the interface. So far so good. I wish that I had placed it in a regular computer to see if it would make its specs, but that would not change its operation in the Inspiron, only satisfy a curiosity on my part. 5Breathes New Life into Old Machines A great end of life "kicker" for an old computer! Was happily surprised to learn such a product even existed. I bought the 64GB version because I didn't need anymore, and it had a higher proportion of high reviews to low reviews. I installed it in a 12 year old Pentium M based laptop originally shipped with Windows XP. Physically all the mounting holes on the drive lined up with those on the laptop's drive carrier, but unlike a normal hard drive, the holes on the drive were not tapped, so every turn of the screwdriver was driving the screw into the plastic drive body for the first time. Note that I used the original screws from the laptop. I had forgotten about the ones included with the SSD. Maybe those would have worked better. Oh well...at least it fit and stayed put.I installed Windows 8.1 on this old machine without difficulty or problem. The drive worked fine from beginning onward. My laptop had an ATA/100 IDE spec so I wanted to see how fast the drive was. Using both Crystal Disk Mark and HD Tune (old version) , transfer rates topped out at 60MBps reading and about 30MBps writing. Access time average about 0.5ms, WAY faster than any hard drive, but still much slower than the 0.1ms on every Crucial SATA SSD I've measured. Anyway, it appears that the drive interface is designed as ATA/66. But why not higher? Why not all the way up to ATA/133?BOTTOM LINE - Useful but not cheap product that breathes new life and satisfaction into old machines. 4works.. here is the missing NTLDR fix... So I bought this having read the reviews.. and yes some people had issues getting it to work with the NTLDR missing.I also had that.. tried XP and Vista.In the end I found this thread to be helpful:http://forum.thinkpads.com/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=41568&start=690and specificallyinstall XP until it fails..then:How to set up GRUB4DOS bootloader on Win XP system drive?What is GRUB4DOS? More info :arrow: http://grub4dos.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_PageFirst of all, please download following files:MBR installer: grubinst_1.0.1_bin_win.zipGRUB4DOS files: grub4dos-0.4.4.zipThis instruction shows one of the way to set up GRUB4DOS. There are other ways, but they are recommended for more advanced users.Step 1 (on another computer with properly installed Windows).Download and unpack grubinst_1.0.1_bin_win.zip into grubinst folder, and grub4dos-0.4.4.zip into grub4dos folder.Step 2Connect system drive (in this case CF card from X40) with installed Windows XP (you may use USB card reader for CF) to computer described in Step 1.Step 3Find connected disk number in Disk Management (you may start this tool typing diskmgmt.msc in Run command from Menu Start ). Identify CF disk number (it will by different from 0!).Step 4Run grubinst_gui.exe form grubinst , in the program window select Disk in Device Name tab and open list with options (hd0), (hd1), ... and select option with number from Step 3 (if CF in card reader was Disk2 then select (hd2) ). Click Install button. Command box will appear with the following content:Code:The MBR has been successfully installedPress any key to continue ...Read it content, and hit space to close it. Now click Quit button to close Grub Installer window.Important note:If you select other drive number than related to CF card, you may found troubles booting your current Windows installations, so be carefully.Step 5Copy grldr file from grub4dos folder (file is with no extension, it is about 200kB) into main directory of CF card.Step 6Copy menu.lst (.lst like LIST , not FIRST ) file form grub4dos folder into main directory of CF card.Open copied menu.lst with notepad, delete all content, and paste following content:Code:chainloader /ntldrSave changes to menu.lst and exit notepad.Now your CF card with Windows XP will boot in any drive geometry (X40 IDE, card reader) without NTLDR is missing error.If you encounter any BSOD (blue screen of death) on the later phase of loading Windows XP, it is not related to GRUB4DOS (or other bootloader), but to other incompatibilities of current Windows installation.you are on your own.. don't ask me for support.. we did this it worked...we did have to run GRUBINST as admin for it to see the drives.. 5Had to troubleshoot for hours to figure out that this drive is more advanced than I thought, but thats a good thing, its fast! It is Advanced Type SSD so it can't detect more than 8GB in old BIOSes on some machines from 97 or earlier, but, I was able to bypass this by using AOMEI and EaseUS Partition Master after using FDISK to setup the primary dos partition, extended partition and LOGICAL partition, note: that logical partition allowed me to set a small 1gb partition for a D drive for data while keeping the original C drive at 6gb for fast booting. I was able to resize the D drive using EaseUS Partition Master to 52gb and now I am making use of all of the drive space.If anyone plans to use this in an ancient machine not compatible with the advanced type of architecture this uses, this solution works. No complaints however, that difficult process only applies to outdated BIOS machines that usually only run 98 or earlier, XP doesn't have this issue, and windows 2000 i think is also unaffected. incredibly fast drive however, 30 second boot time on 98 SE 5Worth the money to get higher performance from an older laptop. As noted by other reviewers on-line, this drive seemed very slightly too large for the caddy in my old Dell laptop. The caddy slid into place normally but stuck out a fraction of an inch beyond the side of the laptop case. Not a big deal, but I was unable to achieve a better result even after several tries. A full restore from an image of the original 60GB hard drive worked with no problems and the laptop booted on the first try. I didn't have an opportunity to measure the boot time vs. the old drive but this one boots to the desktop in less than 60 seconds while the old one might take three minutes or more, even after defragmentation. This laptop can't be easily replaced by a newer one due to some compatibility issues, so it was worth spending the money to get a large increase in performance. I hope that the SSD drive holds up well in daily use. 4Decent "Yansen" SSD In short: this SSD works well, despite an issue with mounting.In detail: It seems that KingSpec may be sourcing these devices from a new manufacturer; the SSD I received was labeled "Yansen" rather than "KingSpec". I've read other reviews indicating that the original KingSpec SSD had a plastic case with unthreaded holes; this one has a metallic case with threaded holes.On the upside, it fit perfectly within the HD caddy for my ancient Compaq Presario R3000 laptop. On the downside, after screwing it in to the caddy, the SSD was aligned just a little too far forward to fit correctly into the laptop. However, I can't be certain whether this is a flaw of the SSD or of the laptop, as Compaq/HP quality control was pretty bad when this laptop was produced...In any case, I've jury-rigged the bare SSD into the laptop's HD cavity using tape and foam, and it works fine (this laptop is going to serve as a desktop machine, so I don't need the case to be perfect). Over the last week, I've formatted the SSD, loaded the OS onto it, booted from it, and loaded enough data to fill it to about 20% capacity, and no problems so far. I'll try to update this review after using the SSD for a while. 4Interesting to find this Upgrade First of all, just like the title suggests. This was an interesting find for me, when looking to upgrade an older laptop that I had laying around. I decided that I would use this little laptop as a "school" computer. So looking at the specifications of it, I figured I would need to max out it's potential. First added more ram bringing it from 256mb, to 2GB. Then looked at wifi adapters, got it a 300mbps wireless N card. Following doing that Windows XP sp 3 decided to crash on me...(non recoverable). Found an old 40GB HDD 4200 RPM...Loaded Ubuntu Linux on it...Worked great for a time....Then started slowing down, and the drive was getting full....Started searching for a larger drive...Stumbled across this little guy. Figured "Why Not"...+So far is working great+Fairly decent size drive for an older machine+Older interface, yet is an SSD (old tech gets new tech standards)+Seems to speed up even Ubuntu Linux on an older machine (Linux is pretty fast before this upgrade)-Yet to encounter anyOther thoughts:Will probably update this review after some time has pasted...Only got the drive about a day ago. Installation of OS took 28.3 minutes, versus Win XP's 3 hours. That's a huge difference if you ask me. 4New Life in my 15 year old laptop. I installed this in a Dell Inspiron 2500 (circa August 2001) running Windows 2000 SP4 Professional a day ago. Took me a while to find HDD-to-SSD cloning software that would run on Win2K. Once I got my OS running on this, I approximate that it boots 2-3 times faster and my laptops fan almost never comes on (whereas it used to scream even at bootup). My HDD was a paltry 10GB, now I have a nice 64GB drive. I am glad they make a PATA SDD. Because I use multiple partitions (3), at the beginning it was saying 'found generic drive, can't use it until restart'...something like that. I'm thinking it was a one-time installation of drivers to use these partitions like separate drives. After restarting three times (it only installed drivers like one drive at a time LOL) it all runs fine. I am happy I was able to resurrect this machine as I still have some devices that have parallel ports (these days the only way to get a parallel port on a laptop is with a docking station). Now just have to replace my RTC/BIOS battery... 4
64GB KingSpec 2.5-inch PATA/IDE SSD Solid State Disk (MLC Flash) SM2236 Controller

64GB KingSpec 2.5-inch PATA/IDE SSD Solid State Disk (MLC Flash) SM2236 Controller

4.0
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
€94,00
Sale price
€94,00
Regular price
€154,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€60,00)